Nimble Minded

Nimble Minded

These days, I’ve become increasingly interested in the different types of working environments currently available for software engineers. My past has included a wide variation of project sizes, companies, technologies and system quality. That gives me a sense of how much variance is out there in different development shops, but my exposure has been limited to companies in several technology industries only. I’d like to know what other environments exist, and how people feel about them.

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Digital Culture (Geek Perspective)

Digital Culture (Geek Perspective)

Couple days ago, I read something interesting from the internet about working culture in a Korean technology company (from a Korean expert as well #LOL). Well, for me to bring up this technology culture and organization will be a loooooong debate topic. As my simple understanding about technology, is the manifestation of us applying our intellect, which is the current course set by evolution.

It tried big and powerful, but failing that it is now trying ‘dynamic’; an ability to adapt to one’s surrounding much faster than gradual mutations ever could. Early years, when I got out of school, I remember being very wary of accidentally working for a software sweatshop provider. It was a frequent conversation between new grads. All sorts of industries have variations on this theme but in programming, sweatshops had already started to become significant hazards.

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Coding is Like Sex!

Coding is Like Sex!

I reviewed weekly project update from my team, and it is time for me to get serious about building software systems, especially after listened many requirement and their issues. But in general case, I would like to share about focus of our effort toward project when we deliver solution as a software engineer, herewith the story…

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Generation Y

Generation Y

Couple days ago, there was a discussion with my colleagues (re. Risman Adnan and Andy Djiwandono) about the redesign of graduate school’s curriculum over the last years by incorporating critical theory into is obligatory learning study plan – this is related with leadership maturity of people after they are graduated from their formal education. It’s not a surprise that executive managers have realized that teaching pure business theory and practice is not sufficient to develop great managers. Critical thinking, either taught in the legal or the humanities field, is becoming a more and more essential element of any management executive’s mental skill set. Whoever learned to read and understand literary theorist like Foucault or the legal intricacies of some critical landmark decisions will not be easily intimidated by complex business (and/or relationship) problems.
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Knowledge is The Life of The Mind

Knowledge is The Life of The Mind

Last week, I went to a seminar of university publishers and writers, they are discussing about intellectual properties, collaboration and knowledge bases. As a software engineer, ‘intelligence’ is basically raw human thinking power. It’s our ability to work through problems. In order to employ intelligence effectively in our world, we need data. And that data needs to be structured and interconnected to make it usable to us. Usable, organized data is what I take to be ‘knowledge’. Its all ready to be utilized.
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Death of the “many” Gadgets

Death of the “many” Gadgets

I have always enjoyed gadgets. Google’s new dictionary (http://www.google.com/dictionary) defines gadget as follows: “A gadget is a small machine or device which does something useful…” For years, specific items were engineered to perform a specific function. A hammer is a hammer. A screwdriver is a screwdriver. A saw is a saw. Every profession has its own gadgets, whether we’re an engineer, doctor, accountant, driver, or musician.
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Professionalism of Everything.

Professionalism of Everything.

The question was: “What responsibility do software engineer professionals have to society at large and to other members of their profession? Do they have any responsibilities or are their working lives solely measured in terms of their adherence to company policy and goals? How does this translate into the broader area of business ethics?“Maybe I seem profane in many’s eyes, but I do think, that computing professionals don’t have any special responsibilities. We’re not special, although many of us like to think so. In my opinion all our responsibilities are determined by our actual role. This profession nowadays is not a single one. When I started to work, all IT experts had to be able to write programs, install software, in most cases train people. Nowadays you cannot be trainer, engineer, developer, help-desk professional in the same time. Even those categories are split into numerous other categories. In my opinion, our work is glued to work of others, our roles have their pair among the old, existing roles. Let’s take some examples: IT trainer – teacher, software developer – engineer, user support – mechanic, etc. Of course I don’t say, that every role existed in the past. I believe, that the responsibility’s roots are the same now and were the same in the past.
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Everything is Simple, It’s People Who Complicate Things!

Everything is Simple, It’s People Who Complicate Things!

Skill set standardization thru software certification in R&D operation become a trending topic these days among all overseas R&D center. I just want to share an experience, how we can learn complex algorithm problems as a software engineer. Well, the right way to learn an algorithm is breadth-first, not depth-first. We need to survey the space, learn the names of things, figure out what’s what.
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